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Katherine Pethers

BA (Hons) Fine Art

An Adoration: An Abyss [installation view], 2019, mixed media, dimensions variable

My current practice resides in the study of semiotics and relies prominently on the act of curation. Focusing on epistemology, the work aims to trace both linear and non-linear narratives resulting in an archive of visual 'prose'. The work consists of installation, drawing, curation, sculpture and other cross-disciplinary practices; gathering, writing, sound / recordings etc. 

Described as having been excavated, the works often appear emergent rather than resultant of the hand. I aim to approach the work as if I have found it, dug it up, perhaps I was the one who buried it many years ago also. 
             // perhaps not.

An Adoration: An Abyss [detail], 2019, mixed media

An Adoration: An Abyss [detail], 2019, wool, sculpted solder, river pearl

I am interested in the translation of sacred to profane and, conversely, the imbibement of temporal, earthly objects with sanctity. Relics are, therefore, a key motif returning throughout my work. 

To make holy //      - 
           To dance with small feet, 
We are dough held in the hands  
//not yet risen, 

And All That Tarmac, 2019, hand made book, printed with text and drawing, bound in linen

Untitled [Shepherd], 2020, baked dough, bronze, wood, 17 cm x 7 cm

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Jasper Appleby-Sherring

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Forcer and Bird Bath, 2020, terracotta, 100 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm

I want to make work that presents the potential that everyone has to construct their own worlds. Setting out proposals and possible solutions to issues of living in the climate crisis.

Forcer and Bird Bath (close-up)

Plant Pot, 2020, terracotta, 21 cm x 19 cm x 19 cm

It’s about making your own (DIY). Taking control of the means of production. To value what you’ve made, to look after it and to know how to fix it. Making systems and cycles accessible - bringing them within reach. From making my own plant pots to facilitating compost building and growing your own luffa in the results. I want to investigate what fun can be had in trying to adjust our lives and environments to be more sensitive to the natural world.

Plant Pot [PlantPot2], 2020, terracotta, 21 cm x 19 cm x 19 cm

Plant Pot [Plant Pot2] (close-up)

Small Pots, 2020, terracotta, variable sizes

Vase, 2020, terracotta, 29 cm x 19 cm x 19 cm

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Freya Moffat

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Untitled, 2020, giclee paper, 42 cm x 29 cm, 1/25

I am a painter, sculptor and draftsperson.

My most recent work uses papier-mache, recycled cardboard boxes and is ultimately documented as photographs. The photographs are taken, for the most part, from outside of the domestic background into which the sculptures are subsumed; eerie, papery reflections of us at home.

Untitled, 2020, giclee paper, 42 cm x 29 cm, 1/25

Untitled, 2020, giclee paper, 42 cm x 29 cm, 1/25

The process of finding and sculpting form is intimate and physical. The life-sized sculptures are interacted with, cared for, arranged in a domestic setting. The photographic documentation, on the other hand, flattens the sculptures and their surroundings so that they sit on one plane.

The combination of sculpture and photography makes the art ‘object’ purposefully illusive; the distance between the viewer and sculpture makes what might be a more visceral reaction to the work, an invitation to an extended reflection.

Untitled, 2020, giclee paper, 42 cm x 29 cm, 1/25

Virtual Installation View

Virtual Installation View

Virtual Installation View

Virtual Installation View

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Eddie Howard

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Dad, Zoom Screenshot, 2020, gouache on board, 29 cm x 42 cm

I predominately use Gouache on board, creating chalky, permeable surfaces into which my watery paint absorbs like paper. I work in series, using archetypal subjects to explore the tradition of European painting. I consider painting as an act of drawing; often from life, sometimes photographs, as in my recent series of FaceTime portraits. The real subject of my work, however, is the act of observation and recording. The finished work becomes a souvenir of the time spent obsessively pursuing colours, an honest record of my exchange with the subject:

I think about making a 1 for 1 translation of the physical world; each blob of paint is a recording of an area of colour I’ve observed. It could be anywhere from 30-500 recordings that make up the entire image. It’s like being a big camera with a very slow exposure, except unlike a camera you also record your behaviours during the making of the painting. I see areas where I have meticulously and obsessively recorded the correct colours, and areas of broader, more hasty brushstrokes.

Olly Zoom Screenshot, 2020, gouache on board, 17 cm x 23 cm

Six Shoes Trip-Tych, 2020, gouache on board, Total 113 cm x 50 cm

Jack Facetime Screenshot, 2020, gouache on board, 50 cm x 36 cm

Jack Facetime Screenshot 2, 2020, gouache on board, 20 cm x 35 cm

Degree Show, Installation view, 2020

Unit 1 Gallery, Installation view, 2020

Climping Flint Stones Six-Typch, 2020, gouache on handmade paper, total: 131 cm x 61 cm (Each work: 42.4 cm x 29.5 cm)

Flintstone, found on the Sussex coast where I am from, is the subject of my current series of works. 

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Beatriz Santa-Rita Campinos Pocas

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Folded Rooms, 2019, oil on hinged MDF board, unfolded: 30 cm x 148 cm x 1 cm

Folded Rooms, 2019, oil on hinged MDF board, folded: 30 cm x 50 cm x 8 cm

This set of works is an investigation of our own place and shape and of the world around, through “painting boxes” and other apparatuses that reanalyse and reintegrate the painted surface.

Palette Sky (from Painting Boxes Series), 2020, oil on acetate, mirror, MDF, 10 cm x 15 cm x 15 cm

Tangled Limbs, 2020, oil on canvas, 87 cm x 98 cm

The materials used range from paper, MDF board and canvas to the use of such materials beyond the 2D and trying to break into the space around and evidencing elements such as light, our own body and their movements, the passage of time. The work deals with ideas of simultaneity of times and memory and it links the painting process with our own existential conundrums. 

The change of the pieces through time and in different condition of light throughout the day is as important as the difference caused by the viewer that can explore with curiosity and use the motion of their body or touch to affect the final result or image.

The Game of Catching Shadows, 2020, ink on paper, shadow, one day, set of photographs

Time in the Shape of a Window, 2020, photographs of installation, painting size: 85 cm x 151 cm

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Georgia Fraser

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Eleven of Ninety-Seven Mud Balls, 2020, locally sourced clay and earth, dimensions variable (detail)

My work uses sculpture and drawings to explore ideas relating to senses of place, time scales, material transformations and our ever-changing relationship to the natural world.

Proposed installation view, 2020, digital drawing

Ninety-seven days (curation notes), 2020, graphite on cotton rag paper, 210 mm x 297 mm

I like to work with non-traditional art materials such as locally-sourced unfired clay, earth and other materials which provide a direct link to a particular site. This method of working enables my practice to be more ecologically conscious as there is minimal environmental impact. Works can be broken down, reformed and reworked into something new. The ephemeral nature of my work becomes a poetic reference to natural and immaterial processes such as fragility, growth, decay and impermanence.

Horseshoe Bridge (surface study series) 2020, graphite on cotton rag paper, 210 mm x 297 mm

Coppermill Fields (surface study series) 2020, graphite on cotton rag paper, 210 mm x 297 mm

The Wetlands (surface study series) 2020, graphite on cotton rag paper, 210 mm x 297 mm

Repetition II, 2020, clay on paper, 148 mm x 210 mm

There is a simplicity and meditative aspect to the making of the work which reflects a yearning to be more mindful and present.

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Jack Chauncy

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Bank of England 1804 (no.1), 2020, charcoal on Fabriano cotton paper, 380 cm x 110 cm

Bank of England 1804 (no.2), 2020, charcoal on Fabriano cotton paper, 110 cm x 76 cm

I like to think of my drawings as visual investigations that enrich my experience of interpreting history. While drawing is my primary mode of expression as an artist, I am continually engaged in the materiality of paintings as I am currently studying the conservation of easel paintings.

The body of work I submitted for my degree show are transcribed areas of cloudy skies from 19th century engravings of the Bank of England. These line drawings are instilled with a sense of movement that disrupts the viewer’s consideration of a supposedly stable institution. Drawn in charcoal on paper, the method of production is simple and direct. In the largest of the works, multiple sheets of paper amass to form an expansive panorama that becomes progressively amorphous the closer you get. I want these drawings to have a fragmented and unstable quality that is implicit upon prolonged observation. I hope they are somewhat reflective of the period of time in which they were made.

Bank of England 1814 Detail, 2020, charcoal and chalk on Fabriano paper, 76 cm x 55 cm

Bank of England 1814, 2020, charcoal on Fabriano paper, 110 cm x 76 cm

Bank of England Lothbury Court (no.1), 2020, charcoal on Fabriano paper, 152 cm x 55 cm

Bank of England Lothbury Court (no.2), 2020, charcoal on Fabriano paper, 76 cm x 55 cm

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Louise Deane

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Visions of Connection I, 2020, oil paint on MDF, 58 cm x 58 cm diameter

My fascination lies in what connects us to one another and the importance of our shared humanity. We are unique in our DNA, fingerprints and irises, but have different social, cultural and personal experiences, set within the context of our time. My belief is that what we share collectively can outweigh difference.

I am interested in the physiology of the human body; our need for food, water and care, and our psychological need for meaning, or spirituality, in our lives. My particular interest is in the spiritual beliefs of Native Americans which stems from my part-Cherokee heritage.

Visions of Connection II, 2020, oil paint on MDF, 100 cm x 100 cm diameter

Visions of Connection III, 2020, oil paint on MDF, 75 cm x 75 cm diameter

I have found that there are consistent themes and imagery that occur across science, philosophy and psychology; in particular, the symbolic and archetypal motif of the circle and its meaning, in that it can communicate the importance of both the connection to ourselves, and to each other, and how relevant this is to the world we live in now.

Visions of Connection IV & V, 2020, oil paint on MDF, Installation View

Visions of Connection I, V & VI, 2020, oil paint on MDF, Installation View

Visions of Connection VI, 2020, oil paint on MDF, 50 cm x 50 cm diameter

Visions of Connection VII, 2020, oil paint on MDF, 80 cm x 80 cm diameter

Visions of Connection VIII, 2020, oil paint on MDF, 110 cm x 110 cm diameter

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Leili Khabiri

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Due to lack of space I could not set up my installation (graduation piece) at home, instead here are images of some elements/ideas that would make up part of the installation.

Untitled, 2020, hand embroidery on canvas, 300 cm x 200 cm

Untitled, 2020, hand embroidery on canvas, 300 cm x 200 cm

Madman and Sleeze: Journey to Eden, 2020, hand embroidery on canvas, 200 cm x 100 cm

Untitled, 2020, dead Insect, semi-precious stones, mother of pearl (all of which are found), wire

Untitled, 2020 (detail from four walls of 44 crucifixes (part of installation)), dead insects, semi-precious stones, mother of pearl (all of which are found), wire, varying from 20 cm x 30 cm to 5 cm x 7 cm

Crucifixion kitchen, a place I made not for them nor for Satan, but my favourite pet chicken, because when it is night and you are sleeping she is also dreaming.

Dream Demon, 2020, watercolour, 30 cm x 42 cm (from series of 8 watercolours)

The Devils Danced Until the Sea Ignored the Moon, 2020, watercolour, 30 cm x 42cm (from series of 10 watercolours)

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Andrew Szczech

BA (Hons) Fine Art

Constraint, 2020, oil on canvas and 2mm mild steel, 205 cm x 270 cm

In search of the sublime, I’m a painter who acts as a mediator between conscious actions and the activity of material. On a metaphorical level, I focus on the investigation of systems and structures and their symbiotic relationship with those existing within them.

Incompatible materials are routinely used that squabble with each other to achieve supremacy. Traditional artists’ materials such as linen, canvas, graphite and oil paints are contrasted against industrial materials including steel, girders and aluminium. 

Ghost, 2020, oil on canvas, 205 cm x 135 cm

Net, 2020, oil on canvas and welded steel, 205 cm x 135 cm and 205 cm x 8 cm x 8 cm

Constantly evolving, ghosts of earlier images are frequently reused as recurring motifs. Palettes range from the neon intensity of colours used in the construction industry to those used in a restrained Gwen John portrait. Netting, belt sanders and other heavy duty equipment are employed in order both to avoid habituation and so that their indexical marks are embedded within the surface itself.

Net2, 2020, drawing ink on watercolour paper, 19 cm x 14 cm

Sewer, 2020, drawing ink on watercolour paper, 22 cm x 13.5 cm

Stripes, 2020, oil on canvas, 205 cm x 135 cm

Structure, 2020, metal channelling and oil on canvas, copper and aluminium, Variable

System, 2020, oil and graphite powder on canvas and 1mm mild steel, 88 cm x 125 cm

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